Richard Pottyer

Richard Pottyer –

a man who could predict the future?

Richard Pottyer’s claim to fame is his ability to predict the future in Thomas More’s unfinished The History of King Richard III.  The main problem with this work is that nobody can be sure today what is actually true and what is not. Continue reading

Thomas Barowe – Richard III’s Master of the Rolls: Part III

Thomas Barowe – 

Richard III’s Master of the Rolls,

churchman, administrator,

and bound by loyalty

Part III:  the Later Years

How the young man from Winthorpe in Lincolnshire became very successful as the man of Richard of Gloucester, later Richard III, was dealt with in Part I and Part II.  Part III will look at his later years under Henry Tudor. Continue reading

Thomas Barowe – Richard III’s Master of the Rolls: Part I

Thomas Barowe – 

Richard III’s Master of the Rolls,

churchman, administrator,

and bound by loyalty

Part I:  Early Years

Thomas Barowe was Richard III’s Master of the Rolls. It is a great pity that to most historians of the late middle ages, he remains a nondescript footnote, not warranting any further details.[i]

Richard III chose as his motto ‘Loyalty Binds Me’.  Obviously, he felt bound by loyalty to those around him, but it would also be fair to say that he appreciated the loyalty of others in return.  One man who remained loyal to Richard until his own death – 14 years after the Battle of Bosworth – was Master Thomas Barowe.  The following is an attempt to find out more about this man and to show him as an integral part of Richard’s closely interconnected affinity. Continue reading

The Manor of Mawedelyne

The Manor of Mawedelyne in Hertfordshire – a puzzle solved?

This research into the manor of Mawedelyne grew out of an interest in the life of Master Thomas Barowe, whom, on 22 September 1483, Richard III appointed Master of the Rolls.[1] In a ‘Feet of Fines’ record, dated 1 July 1484, John and Joan Forster and Thomas and Edith Holbache transferred their interest in the manor of Mawedelyne to Robert Brackenbury, Thomas Barowe, Morgan Kidwelly, Thomas Fowler and Richard Beeston, and to the heirs of Robert Brackenbury for 300 marks of silver.[2] Continue reading